Thursday, 9 December 2010

How to make a Lead Weighted Truncheon - Tutorial



How to make a Lead Weighted Wood Truncheon, easy to make Trucheon, No need for a lathe or other complicated tools.


TRUNCHEON WIKI -
A truncheon or baton (also called a cosh, Paddy wacker, billystick, billy club, nightstick, sap, blackjack, stick) is essentially a stick of less than arm's length, usually made of wood, plastic, or metal, and carried by law-enforcement, corrections, security, and (less often) military personnel for less lethal self-defense, as well as control and to disperse combative and non-compliant subjects. A truncheon may be used to strike, jab, block, and aid in the application of armlocks. Truncheons are used to a lesser extent by non-officials because of their easy concealment, and are outlawed in many jurisdictions. They are also frequently used to rescue people who are trapped—for instance, in cars or buildings that are on fire, by smashing windows and doors.

HISTORY -
In the Victorian era, police in London carried truncheons about one foot long called bully clubs (from the word bully, a nickname for police officers). This impact weapon has developed into several varieties available today. The truncheon is a straitstick (see below) made from wood or a synthetic material, approximately 1.25 inches (32 mm) in diameter and 18 inches (460 mm)36 inches (910 mm) long, with a fluted handle to aid in gripping. Truncheons are often ornamented with their organizations' coats of arms. Longer truncheons are called "riot batons" because of their use in riot control.
Truncheons probably developed as a marriage between the club/mace and the staff of office/sceptre.
Straight batons of rubber have a softer impact. Some of the kinetic energy bends and compresses the rubber and bounces off when the object is struck. The Russian police standard-issue baton is rubber, except in places, such as Siberia, cold enough that the rubber can become brittle and break if struck.
A modern wooden baton.Until the mid 1990s, British police officers carried traditional wooden truncheons of a sort that had changed little from Victorian times. After the early 1990s, forces replaced truncheons with side-handle and collapsible batons for all but ceremonial duties.


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